Caffeine Possibly Has A Positive Effect On Fibrosis Development

Coffee machines (www.leascoffee.com)in many hospitals and clinics are good. A recent study shows that caffeine could even have a positive effect on fibrosis development especially those with Hepatitis C symptoms.

People with chronic hepatitis C who drink around 620 milliliters of coffee a day (equivalent to 308 milligrams of caffeine) may have a lower risk of advanced fibrosis.

This is the conclusion reached by Canadian and US liver specialists in a contribution for the journal “Hepatology”. From 2006 to 2008, the researchers performed a liver biopsy on 177 patients to assess the condition of the liver. 121 of the 177 study participants had chronic hepatitis C. In 123 patients, none (42) or only mild fibrosis (81) was found, in 54 advanced fibrosis, 18 of whom had cirrhosis. (In fibrosis, connective tissue cells take the place of liver cells over the course of months or years. In the further course, cirrhosis of the liver with scarred shrinkage of the liver and loss of liver function can occur, and in a small number of cases also liver cancer after many years. )

This is not to say that patients rely solely on coffee. A healthy eating habit is still needed with lots of water intake.

The study participants also filled out questionnaires about their coffee consumption. The question was asked about the type of caffeinated luxury foods (coffee, decaffeinated coffee, black or green tea, caffeinated soft drinks such as cola and the like), the amount consumed and changes in consumer behavior in the months and years before the study.

The results seem to suggest a connection between increased coffee consumption and less severe fibrosis, particularly in patients with chronic hepatitis C. A good third of the 84 hepatitis C patients with mild fibrosis consumed more than 308 mg of caffeine per day, in the 37 patients with more advanced ones Fibrosis was only 4 (11%). This relationship persisted even after other factors such as age, gender, body mass index or alcohol consumption were eliminated. However, the calculations are based on an assumed average value of 137 mg of caffeine per 236 ml of coffee – according to Wikipedia, the content can fluctuate between around 60 and 190 mg.

The result shows that the connection between coffee intake and the dangers of fibrosis is not linear. If those who participated were divided based on their coffee intake, their risk of fibrosis appears to be lower in the first quarter which is by far the lowest caffeine intake compared to the succeeding quarters. Therefore, the researchers were considering it feasible that caffeine has a positive effect on the development of fibrosis.

It remains unclear what the presumed positive effects of caffeine are. The study results seem to indicate that only “normal”, non-decaffeinated coffee lowers the risk of fibrosis, but not caffeine from tea, cola or other drinks. The authors point to recent laboratory research that some coffee components such as caffeine could affect certain enzymes and reduce the accumulation of toxins in liver cells. It is also believed that the formation of connective tissue growth factors is inhibited.